Driving While… Diabetic?

Driving While Diabetic

Getting arrested for drunk driving can be really scary. Getting pulled over and arrested for drunk driving when you haven’t been drinking or aren’t drunk? That can be even worse. Surprisingly, one of the things that could lead to a false DUI conviction is if a driver is suffering from low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) or high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), due to diabetes. The American Diabetes Association estimated in 2012 that there are nearly 19 million people in the United States living with diabetes – and that only includes the people that have been diagnosed and know about it.

Unfortunately, if you are wrongly convicted of drunk driving, the consequences are the same – possible jail time, loss of license, fines, and the potential loss of your ability to work or provide for your family and loved ones. Defending against drunk driving charges can be extremely complicated. In order to prove you were falsely arrested, you will likely need a good lawyer, presenting expert evidence, to show that you were not driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

If you or someone you know has been arrested or charged with DUI or DWI, we at the Edward M. Janzekovich law blog recommend you reach out to an experienced drunk driving lawyer as soon as possible, especially if you suffer from a medical condition that could be responsible for your situation, like diabetes. You might even be suffering from a medical condition that you do not know about.

Symptoms of Intoxication versus Symptoms of Diabetes

The following symptoms are often associated with low blood sugar or hypoglycemia:

  • Bloodshot or unfocused eyes
  • Blurred vision
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Muscle Fatigue
  • Muscle Trembling or shaking
  • Nausea
  • Nervousness
  • Slurred Speech
  • Sweating

The following symptoms are often associated with high blood sugar or hyperglycemia:

  • Confusion
  • Drowsiness
  • Flushed or red skin
  • Loss of balance
  • Nausea
  • Sweet or fruity breath odor
  • Unusual breathing patterns
  • Vomiting

Not surprisingly, all of these symptoms can also be associated with intoxication. Despite the training that police officers receive, it is all too easy to mistake the signs of intoxication with the signs of someone having a diabetic episode.

In many cases, a person suffering from hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia will act and/or drive abnormally or erratically, leading a law enforcement officer to assume that the person is driving drunk or under the influence of drugs. If there is an accident, the officer may be more inclined to suspect drunk driving than diabetes. The bad breath associated with hyperglycemia, in particular, can easily be confused with alcohol breath and can even lead to a false positive on a road-side breathalyzer test.

One Thing You Can Do if You Know You Have Diabetes

In New Jersey, one of the things you can do if you have been diagnosed with diabetes is to list your condition on the back of your driver’s license. By doing this, you will be able to show a police officer that you have been legally classified with having this health condition. If you are seriously diabetic, you might also consider wearing a medical bracelet that identifies your condition. Both of these measures could also help if you have been in a collision and are unable to tell medical providers that you might be suffering from a diabetic episode.

New Jersey law N.J.S.A. 39:3-10.8a allows a person who is an insulin-dependent diabetic to voluntarily inform the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC) of his or her diabetic status with the sole intent of having the medical condition written on his or her driver’s license. You will need to bring proof of the medical condition – in the form of a statement on your doctor’s prescription pad indicating that you have insulin-dependent diabetes – to the MVC when applying for or renewing your license.

Edward M. Janzekovich Has the Experience You Need if You Have Been Charged or Convicted

Proving you are innocent when you have been charged with driving while intoxicated is not easy. Defending DUI and DWI charges can involve complicated evidentiary issues. For that reason, you should always consult a drunk driving lawyer who understands and can review your case completely. An experienced DWI/DUI attorney can make all the difference. To speak with an experienced New Jersey DWI lawyer about your situation, call us at 732-257-1137 or contact us online today. We serve clients throughout the state of New Jersey.

Can You Beat a New Jersey Traffic Ticket?

New-Jersey-Traffic-Ticket

Did you know that plea bargaining is not allowed in a DUI prosecution in New Jersey? You can plead guilty, but you’ll simply have to accept the punishment handed down by the court. You may, however, be able to get the charges reduced or dismissed entirely if you can successfully challenge the admissibility of critical evidence, such as the blood alcohol test.

Ways to Challenge a Blood Alcohol Test

If you’ve been pulled over while driving in New Jersey and issued a ticket for a moving violation of any kind, you’re typically faced with two options—pay the ticket and accept the consequences or appear before the judge and contest the citation. Don’t be confused—the decision to pay the ticket amounts to a guilty plea and may result in points added to your driving record.

If, on the other hand, you opt to challenge the ticket, there are a number of things you can do. First, you can write the police officer a letter, documenting any extenuating circumstances. The police officer has the discretion to dismiss the charge before you are scheduled to go to court.

Next, you can present your case to the prosecutor. While you cannot plea bargain on a DUI charge in New Jersey, you can seek to have the prosecutor reduce or dismiss charges on other traffic offenses.

If you are unable to convince either the police officer or the prosecutor to reduce or drop the charges, you can schedule a trial before a municipal court judge. You can represent yourself, but it’s in your best interests to have a lawyer advocate for you. The judge won’t be able to help you and the prosecutor will be prepared.

At the trial, you’ll want to bring as much evidence as you can to support your position. If you were ticketed for running a stop sign, but the sign was partially hidden, bring a picture that shows that. If there were witnesses who can testify that you did not violate the law, make certain they are present in court.

Contact Attorney Edward M. Janzekovich

To schedule an appointment with an experienced New Jersey DUI defense attorney, contact my office online or call me at 732-257-1137. There is no cost or obligation for your first meeting. Evening and weekend consultations are available by appointment. I accept all major credit cards.

How a Conviction Can Affect Your Public Employment

Cop with a breath test machine

Here, on the Edward M. Janzekovich law blog, we regularly highlight the penalties for driving while intoxicated that are written into New Jersey law. However, many drivers who are convicted of a DUI or DWI will face additional consequences, including having a conviction affect their work or employment.

If you work in a position of public employment, there is a particularly good chance that a conviction for driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol could result in adverse consequences, from suspension, to loss of pay, to demotion, or even outright termination. For this reason, if you or someone you know is ever arrested, charged, or convicted of driving while intoxicated, you should contact a lawyer who specializes in DUI defense immediately. A good attorney could mean the difference between being convicted or having the charges dropped completely.

Public Employees that Could Be Affected

Many positions of public employment include policies that address drunk driving – either specifically or by more general terms. These policies may be referred to as a Code of Conduct or Code of Ethics. If the language of the policy does not address drunk driving explicitly, drunk driving may still be considered under language prohibiting “conduct unbecoming” of a person in that office or position.

Police officers, firefighters, prosecutors, public attorneys, elected officials, and public administrators are just some of the positions that can be affected by an official Code of Conduct that addresses DUI and DWI convictions.

How a Conviction Could Affect Your Employment

Every position and every code of conduct can address issues with DUI and DWI convictions differently, and different positions at the same office of public agency can be affected differently. Some codes may only address drunk driving while in the course of employment, while others will prohibit intoxicated driving even for employees in their personal or private life.

For example, last month, a high-ranking official in the New York City Fire Department was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol in New Jersey. After he was spotted swerving on the road by police officers, he was pulled over and required to submit to a blood alcohol or breathalyzer test. According to reports, his blood alcohol content (BAC) was .22%, which is nearly three times the legal limit of .08%. He was not in the course of his employment at the time and was operating his personal vehicle.

As a result of this conviction, the official was suspended without pay from his job for 30 days. The official also faces penalties under New Jersey law for driving while intoxicated – which can include loss of driving privileges, significant fines, mandatory installation of an interlock device, and possible jail time.

For many public employees, a DUI or DWI conviction may also affect them in the future, becoming an issue that could cost the employee a promotion, raise, or eligibility for advancement.

New Jersey Drunk Driving Lawyer Edward M. Janzekovich Understands How a Conviction Can Affect Your Job

The penalties for drunk driving are severe. In addition to fines, jail time, and loss of driving privileges, a conviction can also mean professional consequences for many drivers. If you or someone you know is charged with DUI or DWI, an experienced lawyer can also make sure you get the best result possible. A good attorney can make all the difference. To speak with an experienced New Jersey DWI/DUI lawyer about your situation, call us at 732-257-1137 or contact us online today. We serve clients throughout the state of New Jersey.

Proposed Ignition Interlock Law Approved by Senate Judiciary Committee

Man in car blowing into ignition breathalyzer

A bill previously addressed here on the Edward M. Janzekovich law blog was approved by the New

Jersey Senate Judiciary Committee this past week. The proposed legislation, introduced by State Senator Nicholas Scutari, could result in increased penalties for many drivers convicted in the state – including for first time offenders of driving while intoxicated. Specifically, the bill hopes to make it mandatory for anyone who is convicted of DUI/DWI to install an ignition interlock device on his or her vehicle.

Now that the bill has been endorsed by the New Jersey Senate Judiciary Committee, the bill can be considered by the New Jersey Senate and then the State Assembly. The proposal has also been supported by the Advocates for highway and Auto Safety in a letter addressed to Senator Scutari and Vice Chairperson of the Committee, Nia H. Gill.

Ignition Interlock Devices: What Are They and How Do They Work

An ignition interlock device is a breathalyzer machine that is installed in a vehicle to sense a driver’s blood alcohol content (BAC). It is designed to prevent contact us online todaydrinking and driving. It is made up of a mouthpiece, a handheld unit and a cord that attaches to the car’s ignition system. A driver must blow into the mouthpiece to provide a breath sample. If the sample is higher than the programmed limit, typically .05% BAC in New Jersey, then the vehicle will not start.
Once the vehicle is moving, the driver must provide new breath samples – “rolling retests” – every 15 minutes to one hour. If the driver fails a test or retests are not performed on time, the equipment will record a violation. The device also can register and keep track of any attempt to tamper with it.

How This New Bill Can Change the Law

If you are convicted of DUI or DWI in New Jersey, you may be required to install an ignition interlock device on your vehicle. Under current law, someone convicted of DWI for the first time can have their license suspended for either 3 months (if his or her blood alcohol content is between .08% and .099%) or 7 to 12 months (if his or her blood alcohol content is .10% or greater). If a first-time offender is convicted with a blood alcohol content of .15% or greater, he or she must also have an ignition interlock device installed on his or her vehicle during the period of license suspension until between 6 months to 1 year after driving privileges are restored.

Under the proposed laws, any driver would need to have an ignition interlock device installed on the vehicle, regardless of his or her BAC at the time of the first conviction. It is possible that the bill will also lessen the period of license suspension for those individuals, based on the belief that the Ignition Interlock Device requirement could save more lives than suspending driving privileges.

Why Advocates are Supporting the Bill

Senator Scutari stated that he doesn’t believe license suspensions are doing enough to prevent drunk driving accidents and repeat offenses by drivers who have been previously convicted. According to one statistic, the average person arrested for intoxicated has driven drunk on 80 occasions. Another statistic estimates that 50-75% of convicted drivers continue to drive on a suspended license.

An Ignition Interlock Device acts as a mechanical obstacle to driving for the persons. This means that a convicted driver has very little choice except to drive sober, as long as the driver is operating his or her own vehicle.

As always, it is important to recognize that this may not pass into law, or it may pass but then be vetoed. A similar law was vetoed by previous Governor Chris Christie in the past. If the bill is passed, it could prove to be a very costly change for first time offenders, because Ignition Interlock Devices are not cheap to install or maintain.

New Jersey Drunk Driving Attorney Edward M. Janzekovich Can Help DUI and DWI Defendants

Any person charged with driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs should always contact an experienced drunk driving attorney as soon as possible. A knowledgeable lawyer will be able to review the case, provide advice, and possibly provide a complete defense. If you or someone you know is charged with drunk driving in New Jersey, an good lawyer can make all the difference. To speak with an experienced New Jersey DWI lawyer about your situation, call us at 732-257-1137 or contact us online today. We serve clients throughout the state of New Jersey.

Challenging the Traffic Stop in a New Jersey DUI

Traffic-Stop-in-a-New-Jersey-DUI

If you’ve been pulled over by law enforcement officers in New Jersey and your blood alcohol content exceeded the legal level for a charge of drinking and driving, all is not necessarily lost. You have certain constitutional protections that require that police follow specific rules, both in making the traffic stop and after you’ve been detained.

Under the 4th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, you have a guaranteed right to be free from what is considered an unreasonable search or seizure. As set forth in the amendment, for a search or seizure to be “reasonable,” there must first be probable cause. Accordingly, before you can be pulled over, law enforcement officers must first observe a violation of the law or must have a reasonable belief that you have or are in the process of violating the law. Any infraction will provide the basis for a legal stop—a broken tail light, an illegal lane change or failure to obey traffic laws. Furthermore, if you match the description of a fugitive, or if the officer observes contraband or other evidence of illegal activity in your vehicle, that may constitute probable cause.

Once you have been stopped, the police officer may ask you questions. The requirement that you be provided with your “Miranda” warnings does not, however, go into effect, unless you have been taken into custody. The Miranda warnings include the admonition that anything you say may be used against you in court, and that you have the right to have an attorney present. Accordingly, you should be very careful when responding to any comments or questions from the police officer. If, however, the officer arrests you, but fails to provide the Miranda warnings, anything you say may be excluded from evidence at trial.

Contact Attorney Edward M. Janzekovich

To schedule a free initial consultation, contact my office online or call me at 732-257-1137. Evening and weekend consultations are available by appointment. I accept all major credit cards.

Vince Vaughn Charged Over Weekend with DUI at Checkpoint

DUI Checkpoint

Actor and Hollywood Celebrity Vince Vaughn was charged on Friday with driving under the influence of alcohol. The charges were announced by Los Angeles County prosecutors arising from a June 10 stop at a DUI checkpoint in Manhattan Beach, California. He received three charges: misdemeanor driving under the influence of an alcoholic beverage, misdemeanor driving with a blood alcohol level of .08 or higher, and misdemeanor refusing to comply with police.

Although New Jersey’s intoxicated driving law is different than California’s, the nationwide legal limit for blood alcohol content (BAC) is the same at .08% BAC. If you are caught driving with a .08% BAC or higher anywhere in the state, you will likely face charges for driving under the influence under the state’s laws, which do not include different charges for driving under the influence of alcohol and driving while intoxicated as a result of any other substance.

If you or someone you know is arrested, charged, or convicted of DUI or DWI in the state, it is important to consult an experienced lawyer as soon as possible, because establishing a good defense can be complicated and time sensitive.

Vince Vaughn’s Arrest at a DUI Checkpoint

Vince Vaugh, the actor and comedian well-known for his roles in such films as Wedding Crashers and Dodgeball, apparently refused to get out of his vehicle when he arrived as sobriety checkpoint this summer. He subsequently failed a field sobriety test, and the results of the test were captured on a police officer’s body camera. Vaughn then also failed a blood alcohol content test showing that his BAC was .08% or higher.

The fact that he was caught on camera failing his sobriety test is important. As previously discussed on the Edward M. Janzekovich law blog, the standard field sobriety tests in New Jersey can include walking-and-turning in a straight line, standing on one foot, and performing a horizontal gaze nystagmus test. Failing these tests can provide an independent basis for the charges of drunk driving. This is in addition to failing the blood alcohol test, which was likely a breathalyzer test.

Misdemeanor DUI

On Friday, Vaughn was charged with misdemeanor DUI based on this incident. Misdemeanor DUI is charged in California for first, second, or third incidents of drunk driving wherein there is no accident or injury. Fourth or subsequent incidents, or incidents wherein there is an accident or injury may be charged as a Felony DUI.

In New Jersey, the law does not differentiate between misdemeanor (disorderly persons) or felony DUI, as drunk driving is considered a quasi-criminal offense in the state. Nonetheless, the penalties remain extremely serious and can include jail time, as well as severe fines and lengthy loss of driving privileges. Because it is considered quasi-criminal, a DUI conviction will also remain on a person’s permanent driver’s record. At the same time, a drunk driving that results in an accident or injury in New Jersey can result in additional charges depending on the specific circumstances.

If you or someone you know has been charged with driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, you should contact a knowledgeable attorney immediately. Depending on the circumstances of your arrest, you could be facing significant charges and consequences. A good lawyer will be able to review your situation, identify the best defenses, and may even be able to have the charges against you dismissed completely.

New Jersey Drunk Driving Attorney Edward M. Janzekovich Can Fight Your DUI Charges

Every person is different and every DUI or DWI case is different. If you or someone you know is charged with drunk driving or driving under the influence of any substance in New Jersey, you will want an attorney who gives you individual attention and advice that can help. A good lawyer can make all the difference. To speak with an experienced New Jersey DWI lawyer about your situation, call us at 732-257-1137 or contact us online today. We serve clients throughout the state of New Jersey.

ICE and Enforcement and Removal for Drunk Drivers

ICE and Enforcement and Removal for Drunk Drivers

Earlier this summer, 37 individuals were arrested by United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials in New Jersey after the Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) Newark Field Office targeted individuals recently incarcerated for crimes in the state including Drunk Driving.

This news echoes predictions previously made on the Edward M. Janzekovich law blog. As noted, the punishment for DUI or DWI conviction is already extremely serious, but those consequences can be even more far-reaching for those who are not US citizens. In light of recent events, it is important to realize that drunk driving could result in additional consequences for certain non-citizens, because convictions can help Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials locate wanted persons and start a deportation proceeding.

In every case where you or someone you know is charged with driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, it is important to contact a lawyer. In special cases where you believe a conviction might result in your deportation or the deportation of someone you know, it becomes absolutely essential to contact a skilled New Jersey DUI/DWI attorney as soon as possible, in order to present the best possible defense before it is too late.

ICE ERO Arrests Following Middlesex County Incarceration

This summer, ICE officials concluded an operation targeting criminals who were previously housed at the Middlesex County Jail. Those persons were jailed for a variety of crimes, including pursuant to New Jersey’s DUI and DWI statutes. After being released from jail, 37 persons were then arrested by ICE and ERO agents. Some of the individuals arrested had no prior or pending criminal convictions or charges, and this was their first time in jail.

The individuals arrested as part of the operation were nationals of Brazil, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Ivory Coast, Mexico, Nigeria, Peru, and Turkey, and they ranged from 21 to 68 years old.

The acting ERO Newark Field Office Director stated afterwards that his office is committed to enforcing ICE’s directives and goals. Other statements noted that official efforts would take place regardless of whether an individual city considered itself a sanctuary city or planned to cooperate with the ICE directives to detain and advise ICE of the release of certain illegal persons.

How a DUI Arrest Can Affect Non-Citizens and Even Lead to Deportation

A conviction for drunk driving is a quasi-criminal offense. The consequences, including fines, loss of driving privileges, and jail time, are considered as part of the law the prohibits any person from operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated. If you are charged with DUI or DWI, you will likely need to go to Court, at which time the Court will discuss the potential penalties with you that are expressly stated in the law.

As noted above, there are additional consequences that could result that are not specifically discussed by the drunk driving statute. New Jersey Municipal Court judges will generally advise individuals who are non-US citizens of the potential immigration consequences associated with a finding of guilty. However, judges only have to put a person on notice that such consequences might result, and the Court does not provide detailed legal advice on the issue. For that reason, it is best to first consult with a knowledgeable DUI attorney before going to court to make sure you fully understand your rights and options.

Otherwise, if you are a non-citizen and plead guilty to drunk driving, you may not realize that you might prevent yourself from becoming a citizen in the future or it could lead to your deportation.

New Jersey DUI/DWI Attorney Edward M. Janzekovich Understands the Serious Consequences of Driving While Intoxicated

If you are guilty of DWI/DUI, it can mean serious penalties – jail time, heavy fines, and loss of license at a minimum. Certain drivers face additional consequences – based on their work or immigration status. If you or someone you know is charged with driving under the influence, it is important to have a lawyer who knows what penalties can occur and how to help. A good attorney can make all the difference. To speak with an experienced New Jersey DWI lawyer about your situation, call us at 1-732-257-1137 or contact us online today. We serve clients throughout the state of New Jersey.

Challenging the Blood Alcohol Test in a New Jersey DUI

Challenging-the-Blood-Alcohol-Test

Did you know that plea bargaining is not allowed in a DUI prosecution in New Jersey? You can plead guilty, but you’ll simply have to accept the punishment handed down by the court. You may, however, be able to get the charges reduced or dismissed entirely if you can successfully challenge the admissibility of critical evidence, such as the blood alcohol test.

Ways to Challenge a Blood Alcohol Test

One of the best ways to fight a DUI in New Jersey is to challenge the validity of the blood test. To do so, you need to pose legitimate questions about the reliability of the test and the results. Here are some of the questions to ask:

  • Where was the blood test taken and who administered it? Was it done by a licensed doctor or a registered nurse? If the prosecution doesn’t know who took your blood and cannot produce that person to testify at trial, the case may be dismissed.
  • Often, before drawing blood, a nurse or doctor will clean your skin with an iodine swab. Studies have shown that this can have an impact on blood alcohol readings. Ask if that was done. If so, the findings may be subject to challenge.
  • Has the blood alcohol testing machine been properly maintained? When was it last calibrated or serviced? Has it been found to produce inconsistent or false readings in the past?
  • Are you able to conduct an independent test of the blood? Sometimes, police will discard any blood that remains after the initial test. If there’s none left over for you to have an independent test conducted, you may be able to get the charges thrown out.

Contact Attorney Edward M. Janzekovich

To schedule an appointment with an experienced New Jersey DUI defense attorney, contact my office online or call me at 732-257-1137. There is no cost or obligation for your first meeting. Evening and weekend consultations are available by appointment. I accept all major credit cards.

State Senate President Steve Sweeney Says Marijuana Legislation Could Pass in September

New Jersey Recreational Marijuana

Here, at the Edward M. Janzekovich law blog, we have been following the marijuana legalization news closely, because it will likely have far reaching effects for New Jersey residents and drivers. In the past week, New Jersey Senate President, Steve Sweeney, released a statement hinting that recreational marijuana legalization could be passed by the end of the year, possibly as soon as next month.

Specifically, Senator Sweeney, who supports legalization, stated that he believes he has enough support in the Senate to pass the legislation if it were to come to a vote. Senator Sweeney noted that the same holds true for Assemblyman Speaker Craig Coughlin, regarding any vote on corresponding legislation in the New Jersey State Assembly.

Legislation on Recreational Marijuana

Although the specifics of any legislation have not yet been revealed, many state politicians have made their positions on recreational marijuana known. Accordingly, Senator Sweeney stated that he believes he and Assemblyman Coughlin can get the necessary votes to pass any measures in their chambers, 21 and 41 respectively, despite not having presented an official bill.

Senator Sweeney noted that he plans to couple recreational legalization with an expansion of the state’s medical marijuana program, in order to gain more supporters and votes in his favor. Recent expansions to medical marijuana in the State have received support by both Republicans and Democrats, so joining the two measures could force increased support.

There have also been discussions about how to treat individuals previously convicted of marijuana possession, and legislators are considering expunging past criminal records regarding possession.

Previous Efforts to Legalize Marijuana

Earlier this year, Governor Phil Murphy and state legislators passed a new state budget that omitted any mention of recreational marijuana. Nonetheless, Senator Sweeney and Assemblyman Coughlin promised to revisit the issue later this summer. Moreover, Governor Murphy previously made it a goal of his Governorship to make recreational marijuana legal in New Jersey, and he already pushed through large expansions to the medical marijuana program, previously discussed on the Edward M. Janzekovich law blog. Finally, New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal issued an order and guidelines to all county and municipal governments to resolve possession of marijuana cases.

THC or Marijuana Intoxication and Driving

If a system is created for regulating and taxing marijuana sales, New Jersey drivers must still be aware that there are no plans to change how marijuana intoxication is treated by police officers on New Jersey state roads. Moreover, DWI and DUI convictions will not be included with any plan to forgive past criminal convictions for marijuana possession by expungement or removal from criminal records.

Therefore, regardless of what happens with recreational or medical marijuana, it will still be illegal to operate a motor vehicle while impaired due to marijuana or THC consumption, in the same way it is illegal to operate a motor vehicle while drunk even though alcohol is legal. Because a conviction for driving under the influence is quasi-criminal, it also can never be expunged from a person’s driver’s history or driver’s abstract.

If you are convicted of DUI or DWI, it is possible to have a past conviction ignored for the purposes of sentencing if more than ten years has passed since the last conviction. However, your record will still show the past conviction, and this can affect your ability to apply for certain jobs or positions. If you’re convicted, that will likely be permanent, unless it is successfully appealed.

New Jersey DUI Attorney Edward M. Janzekovich Can Help if You Are Charged with Smoking Marijuana and Driving

Accordingly, if you or someone you know is pulled over and arrested or charged with intoxicated driving, you should contact an experienced lawyer as soon as possible. Regardless of how the law changes in this area, a conviction for DUI or DWI will still have significant short and long-term consequences. A good lawyer may be able to have the charges against you dropped or dismissed completely. To speak with an experienced New Jersey DWI/DUI lawyer about your situation, call us at 732-257-1137 or contact us online today. We serve clients throughout the state of New Jersey.

How A DUI or DWI Conviction Can Affect Your Public Employment

Here, on the Edward M. Janzekovich law blog, we regularly highlight the penalties for driving while intoxicated that are written into New Jersey law. However, many drivers who are convicted of a DUI or DWI will face additional consequences, including having a conviction affect their work or employment.

Drunk Driver being pulled over by police cops

If you work in a position of public employment, there is a particularly good chance that a conviction for driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol could result in adverse consequences, from suspension, to loss of pay, to demotion, or even outright termination. For this reason, if you or someone you know is ever arrested, charged, or convicted of driving while intoxicated, you should contact a lawyer who specializes in DUI defense immediately. A good attorney could mean the difference between being convicted or having the charges dropped completely.

Public Employees that Could Be Affected

Many positions of public employment include policies that address drunk driving – either specifically or by more general terms. These policies may be referred to as a Code of Conduct or Code of Ethics. If the language of the policy does not address drunk driving explicitly, drunk driving may still be considered under language prohibiting “conduct unbecoming” of a person in that office or position.

Police officers, firefighters, prosecutors, public attorneys, elected officials, and public administrators are just some of the positions that can be affected by an official Code of Conduct that addresses DUI and DWI convictions.

How a Conviction Could Affect Your Employment

Every position and every code of conduct can address issues with DUI and DWI convictions differently, and different positions at the same office of public agency can be affected differently. Some codes may only address drunk driving while in the course of employment, while others will prohibit intoxicated driving even for employees in their personal or private life.
For example, last month, a high-ranking official in the New York City Fire Department was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol in New Jersey. After he was spotted swerving on the road by police officers, he was pulled over and required to submit to a blood alcohol or breathalyzer test. According to reports, his blood alcohol content (BAC) was .22%, which is nearly three times the legal limit of .08%. He was not in the course of his employment at the time and was operating his personal vehicle.

As a result of this conviction, the official was suspended without pay from his job for 30 days. The official also faces penalties under New Jersey law for driving while intoxicated – which can include loss of driving privileges, significant fines, mandatory installation of an interlock device, and possible jail time.

For many public employees, a DUI or DWI conviction may also affect them in the future, becoming an issue that could cost the employee a promotion, raise, or eligibility for advancement.

New Jersey Drunk Driving Lawyer Edward M. Janzekovich Understands How a Conviction Can Affect Your Job

The penalties for drunk driving are severe. In addition to fines, jail time, and loss of driving privileges, a conviction can also mean professional consequences for many drivers. If you or someone you know is charged with DUI or DWI, an experienced lawyer can also make sure you get the best result possible. A good attorney can make all the difference. To speak with an experienced New Jersey DWI/DUI lawyer about your situation, call us at 732-257-1137 or contact us online today.

We serve clients throughout the state of New Jersey.